They Are Indeed a Very Useful Corps, American Riflemen in the Revolutionary War

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They Are Indeed a Very Useful Corps, American Riflemen in the Revolutionary War - Michael Cecere. The story of America’s riflemen in the Revolutionary War begins with their formation in 1775. First person accounts of their recruitment, long march, and encampment at Boston, introduce readers to the flamboyant and sometimes unruly nature of riflemen. Gripping eyewitness accounts of Benedict Arnold’s march and attack on Quebec and of the battles of Long Island, Harlem Heights, Throg’s Neck, Fort Washington, Trenton, Princeton, and Brandywine, highlight the unique abilities of riflemen and their important role in the war. Nowhere is this role more evident than in the American victory at Saratoga. First hand accounts of the battle provide a detailed image of the fight and the crucial part Daniel Morgan’s riflemen played. The importance of riflemen is also evident in their service on the frontier of New York and in the southern battles of King’s Mountain and Cowpens, all of which are chronicled by participants. The numerous primary accounts of riflemen in the war help readers better understand and appreciate the service of these men and may cause them to conclude, as General Washington did in 1776, that the riflemen “are indeed a very useful corps.” Several maps, a bibliography and an index to names, places and subjects enhance the text. (2006), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 238 pp. 101-C4141 ISBN: 0788441418