Prisoners of War 1861-65: A Record of Personal Experiences, and a Study of the Condition and Treatment of Prisoners on Both Sides During the War of the Rebellion

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Prisoners of War 1861-65: A Record of Personal Experiences, and a Study of the Condition and Treatment of Prisoners on Both Sides During the War of the Rebellion - Thomas Sturgis. This work is reprinted from the Report of an Address Delivered Before the New York Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, February 1, 1911 read by Companion Lieut. Thomas Sturgis, who was a Union guard over Camp Morton near Indianapolis, Indiana in 1864, and a prisoner at Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia in 1865. This report addresses the debate regarding the treatment of prisoners of war during the American Civil War from the Union perspective. Sturgis is well suited to give this account since he had the opportunity to experience first-hand both Confederate and Union prison arrangements. He is articulate and concise giving descriptions of the prisons, the guards, those who escaped, the surrounding elements, the treatment of prisoners, the gross oversights made by some of the men giving the orders, supplies, conduct of guards and prisoners, and the overall differences in prison policy between North and South. This work is a very interesting glimpse at conditions during the war, and will appeal to those searching for first-hand accounts of the Civil War. A new full-name index and illustrations further compliment this account. (1912, 2003), 2017, 5½x8½, paper, index, 90 pp. 101-S2342 ISBN: 0788423428